Will there ever be another Star Wars?

12.30.2021

Tim Whitney 

Alright, and so it begins. Welcome to the inaugural episode of the Heroes & Whiskey Podcast. I'm Tim and I'm here with Jack at the basement bar. The drink on the bar today is a Balvenie old-fashioned, which is what we roll out for special occasions. And since this is the inaugural episode, this is a special occasion. And today we are going to be debating whether or not there will ever be another Star Wars. Small topic.

So before we dive in, I just wanted to introduce this podcast, this is as new to you as it is, to me. Jack has done a couple of podcasts in the past, this is my first one. So we know that you will forgive us if we have technical difficulties, or I just act like I don't know what I'm doing, because that's pretty much the case. So the whole purpose of the Heroes & Whiskey podcast is we wanted to look at the concept of modern storytelling through the perspective of our favorite movies, shows, games, basically anything with a narrative.

And so we're going to be talking about storytelling theory, story structure, character development, and just the kind of the art and the craft of telling stories in the modern age. And I asked Jack to join me because I wanted to have an intergenerational perspective, he is in a different generation than me. Because you know, how we consume stories now is totally different than how it was 20 years ago, or you know, 40 years ago when I was first introduced to Star Wars. And we're doing this because we love the properties and we could talk ad nauseum about them. And we also do it because we are creative types. And so it helps us to deconstruct how the people who know what they're doing, do it so that we know it works. And we know it doesn't. And so in the process, we ourselves become better storytellers.

And so whether you're, you know, a video editor, or you're a dungeon master, or you're so many giving a presentation at work, and all of these things apply. And so yeah, we just hope to have a good time and talk about the things that we love. And so like I said, today's topic, we bit off a big one is will there ever be another Star Wars and so how the way we're gonna break this up, is first we're going to talk about our individual relationships with Star Wars.

Again, we're from different generations, so we have kind of different experiences and different relationships, then we're each going to offer up three things that we think make Star Wars unique and unrepeatable. And then we're going to offer up one reason that we might be wrong. Along the way, I'm sure we'll talk about other properties that might come close, and then we'll kind of throw up a final verdict.

And so without further ado, we will, we'll jump in. And so the first thing that I wanted to do is talk about my relationship with Star Wars and then Jack and give his and so you know, I'm a little bit older. I saw Star Wars when I was seven years old. I remember I was on a family vacation, and my aunt was like, hey, you need to go see this movie, went to go see it. I mean, utterly and completely blown away by what I saw, like being a kid in that era. You'd never seen anything that was even close to that. And like it became the dominant pop cultural thing in my life for probably the next 10 years. I mean, there's other things along the way like Battlestar Galactica and some other things. But, I mean, I obsessed over Star Wars all the time. And not too long after it was released. My parents got me. It was a record of the audio from the movie. So this is like before VHS crazy. Yeah. So it was a record where you listened to it. And it was basically the movie playing on the record. And I mean, I blew that blew through that thing so often that I had the whole thing memorized from the time I was seven, eight, and I had to memorize so much, that I was able to type it up on a typewriter from memory. So utterly ridiculous. Yeah, and you're like, I mean, I still remember my family knows it. Yeah. I you know, I still remember everything to to this day. And of course those are that was back in the day when you didn't have you know, you can only watch it once. If you want to see it again. You had to convince your parents to take you back to the movie theater and if not And you had to just like live off of the record. Yeah. Record and that cards and the comic books and of course, the action figures and stuff like that. And so you know, I, I've enjoyed sharing Starwars with my kids as we've gone along. I'm one of those people. I'm in the camp who actually kind of loved the new Star Wars movies, the prequels I couldn't care less about. But I really do like the new ones. And so yeah, so I mean, I just enjoy talking about Star Wars, because I think it's a unique cultural property. And I'd had a big impact on my life just growing up and my family soon. So that's that.

 

Jack Whitney 

Yeah. I always the same thing for me. And that's because of you. Like you. I think it was around five or six or something like that, correct me if I'm wrong, but that's when we like started playing Lego Star Wars on the PS two. And that was, obviously that was really fun, because we'd stay up all night when the rest of the family was gone. And we play Lego Star Wars and whatnot. But then all my buddies were into it, too. So it was like, it was like out, I was playing Lego Star Wars, we were playing those you Battlefront two, on the PlayStation two and stuff like that. And then watching the prequels when they were out and watching the original movies, like over and over and over again, I remember watching the Attack of the Clones a bunch of times, because that's the generation I'm from. Yeah, and so I remember as a kid, that was like, my favorite Star Wars and lord of the rings were like the two huge things for me. But Star Wars in particular, just because I feel like there's so much I mean, there were like, like, all throughout my childhood there were like video games coming out right? There were there. You know, new like cartoons coming out like the clone wars started to come out. So is this huge thing that when I was a kid, like, not only was there the pre existing stuff that already happened, that you liked, so you show me everything, but there's like, games, movies, TV shows, everything like that was coming out when I was a kid. So it was super exciting for me. And like when I you know, when the sequences have recently come out, and all those same buddies, when Saddam, we all were kind of like, Oh, no. Maybe not like maybe Star Wars just isn't isn't the same thing. But then. So I think I liked the sequels a little bit less than you did. But this isn't a conversation about that, but But I understand kind of like what we're talking about. Now, I understand the significance for a kid who would be watching Star Wars for the first time, like your experience was like, the original trilogy. Yeah, my experience was like the prequel trilogy, of what Star Wars like is and what makes it cool to kids now, Rey, and Finn and all the Kylo Ren like, that's what makes Star Wars cool to kids now, crazy effects and huge battles and space and stuff like that. And that's what it always is. But like, it's a little bit different now. And so, like, maybe to me or to you, the sequels aren't the best, but to another kid, watching Ray lift a bunch of rocks, like, is super cool. So I think I think it definitely was a huge thing growing up. And it's funny, because, like, rewatching, some of the Star Wars stuff, like cool, I remember that way differently than it is now. But it's awesome. Yeah, I mean, it's always gonna have a special place in my heart, your heart, and I think a lot of people's hearts, and that's why it's so special. And that's why this conversation I think, is so relevant,

 

Tim Whitney 

when I remember when row one came out, when I actually when it came out, streaming. And so we watch Rogue One, which of course, dovetails right into a new hope, which wasn't even called A New Hope. When I was just Episode Four when I saw it at seven years old. And it was just Star Wars when you see Star Wars I mean, it was episode four but it wasn't called New Hope. And like you know what you wrote one is obviously made with like modern filmmaking sensibilities, and it moves and there's like action and all that and you go right into the original Star Wars and you're like, Oh, holy moly, this thing is kind of boring. And it's like, okay, there's a fight at the beginning and there's like 45 minutes we're not. Yeah, and so like, it was created in a different era and consumed in a different era. And so that's what I want to talk about. Alright, so First thing that I wanted to do is talk about three things that make Star Wars unique and unrepeatable. And so Jack and I each have our own lesson, I'm going to let Jacko first with his number one, and we can chat about that for a little bit.

 

Jack Whitney 

So my first one is a good segue from what we were just talking about is like the timeline of Star Wars. So it's so vast that you and I can have a conversation about it. And we're from different generations, you know. So like, there's, like I said, before, there's the original trilogy. And then there's the prequel trilogy. And then 2025 years later, there's the sequel trilogy, you know. And so it's like, Star Wars was not just like, a pump out of content over the course of 15 years that everybody tried to enjoy. It was like, No, this is like a 4045 year run of toys of movies or TV shows of video games of everything that kids could possibly delve into, and adults could possibly dive into. And so that's what I think is so, so unique about it is that there's nothing else I mean, there's things obviously that have lasted that long, but not things to this scale, like that, that have had this cultural impact, which is my next point.

 

Tim Whitney 

Yeah. Yeah. Well, and I one of mine was actually very similar to that. And so I'll jump ahead to that one. And that's like, these characters in these moments that are so iconic, that they persist across generations. I mean, it will be very difficult to find a person these days, who doesn't know who Darth Vader is, you know, just by sight. Who doesn't know who Yoda is people who are fans of Star Wars? Yeah, right. No, exactly. And I mean, a phrase like, may the force be with you? Every single day has Yeah, has heard of that. Or even like the No, I'm your father. I mean, it. It's, it's like so ingrained in us culturally, just because it was so full of, like I said, these these iconic moments and these iconic characters that they stuck around with us. I mean, when one of you know, one of my frustrations with the the prequels I mean, even going back all the way to return to the Jedi, is that there aren't those things, you know, will people 45 years from now still be talking about? Rey and Finn, as much as I love those movies? They just like, I couldn't really tell you a quote from one of this one of the modern sequels that, you know, wasn't said by like Han Solo characters, they like so and it's like, like you said, you know, I mean, the first one came out in 1977. So that's, like, 45 freaking years ago. And so what, what other properties are there that they'll still be making movies about 40 years from now? Yeah, I mean, I mean, do the thing, like it's multiple generations that people have been enjoying us? And so yeah, I agree with you on that one.

 

Jack Whitney  

Oh, yeah. So that, like, that kind of feeds into the next thing I was gonna say, which will feeds into both things I was gonna say, but one thing in particular, like, in not when the first one come out, 1977 Yeah, May 25. Star Wars. The, the cultural impact of that was crazy. Like, it was unheard of. And you can, and you see it when you like watch interviews with George Lucas, or he talks about his experience. I mean, he got denied and denied and not like, people looked at his script. And we're like, this is the stupidest thing ever. And then the script turned into a movie, the movie got released, and everybody was like, this is the future like Boba, and eight more movies and 1000s and billions and 10s of billions of hundreds of billions of dollars were made from it. So it's like the, the cultural impact, I think, then, versus now, I think is similar, but different at the same time. Like, it's so easy for people to compare those, like the sequels to the original trilogy. They're like, well, to recapture the magic. Yeah, right. Well, the magic is different now. Yeah. But then that's for a multitude of reasons like that. Whatever you thought the magic was in 1977 is not the magic today. You know what I mean? And so I think back then, obviously, I wasn't alive. Yeah. But I think back then the cultural impact was more than it is now. Because, kids now adults Now we've all been exposed to more Star Trek's and more videos, sci fi, video games, and more this and people have taken the Star Wars idea and expanded on and whatnot. And while it's still sick and awesome, now it's like relive those moments. I don't think you have the same. You have the same outcome that you did in 1977? You know?

 

Tim Whitney 

Yeah. Yeah. Well, and so, but one of my other points was that, you know, the whole idea of stars, and this is still honestly, it's very impressive to me is like, it all came out of one person's brain. Yeah, I mean, so George Lucas, he came up with his idea he came up with this university had this idea for this story and these characters, and obviously, you know, they change over time. But like you said, he, you know, he knew what he wanted to make. He didn't want the studio interference. And so he ended up making what he wanted. And like that kind of thing. These like, I don't know, if it's, if it would ever be possible for someone to do that. With the movies. Now, obviously, there's things like Harry Potter and Game of Thrones. And those are universes that came out of one person's brain, but take it straight out of your brain and make a movie out of it. Yeah, I mean, that's really unique. Of course, the flip side of that is that a enabled George Lucas to basically do whatever he wanted. And so, you know, as you get into even, like, return the Jedi, and they start getting into the prequels, you know, everybody defers to this genius towards Lucas. And some of the stuff it really isn't all that good. Yeah. And, you know, and so you got, but still like, to think that there's this, this cultural property, like he talked about that, like, has transcended generations, and we all consume it differently and think about it differently and interact with it differently. And it came out of one guy's head. Like, that's, that's crazy. I mean, to me, yeah. That's crazy to me that that happens in it. It's unfortunate that, like, these days, I think it will be very difficult for for that to happen. I mean, especially in like a streaming era, where you see so few properties that are like, new or unique ideas. I'm going to including Harry Potter and Game of Thrones, I mean, they were, they were popular books before they were popular movies, and, or TV shows. And, you know, so for so for someone to kind of dump this universe out of their head onto the big screen, I think is is something that it's pretty rare.

 

Jack Whitney 

Yeah. And I'll, I'll tie in my last point with so I mean, like you say, Harry Potter Game of Thrones is a little bit different. Cuz they're books, right? Like they were previously conceived ideas before Star Wars. I don't there weren't like Star Wars books. Like he never made

 

Tim Whitney 

the and I came on after the fact was, Oh, yes, the script and the Moray. Yeah.

 

Jack Whitney 

And so that and so that's like, all tying in kind of my last point with some of those other properties. Like exactly what you said, like, the I don't know, it's so hard, because so many. So many people are like very passionate about it. And when you break it down like this, it's like, it's like, Okay, everybody, just everybody on any side of spectrum chill for one second. Because the internet, and the fan base was not what it was in 1977. Right. And I'm sure there were people like you loved it. Yeah. And I'm sure there's kids just like you when you were seven years old, who are watching The Last Jedi, which everybody vilified and hated. And it's thinking, look at that kid looking up at the stars. I love that. Yeah, that was me. Yeah. So it's like, so it's like, when everybody's on YouTubes. And I'm not saying this is bad, because I think all the criticisms are valid, and I don't love the sequels. Yeah, but the internet sways so much of our opinion. Yeah. Right. And, and oh, man that like, I didn't think about that. And it's good. I love watching criticism. I love watching praise, like people analyze, like, musical themes and story themes and characters. I think that's awesome. And great. I think people should keep doing that. And the more they do that, the smarter the internet and the people watching those videos are gonna get Yeah, but but the when you're tying in the cultural impact, and the people who watched it before versus the people who are looking at it now, yeah, it's never going to be the same and it can't, it can't. Like you can take away the internet and take away the YouTube videos and take away the streaming And whatever the content age that we live in, then it might be the same. But because of the society in the, in the the content age and the Quick Access, like you say you had to listen to the movie through a record, right? By we call it die in my bed. I can go on Disney plus, and watch all of them. Yeah, exactly anytime I want, right, I could get up right now and go watch movies. And so it's like, it's just a different age. Yep. And so like, I think, I think for that reason, I don't think anything will ever be the same. And so this is where I say I'll type in other properties. Like, I think Marvel is a really good example of a property that came really, really close. Yeah, because I don't think it's all boxes, box office numbers when it comes to like influence on the market like, like, it's kind of like music, right? The most streams doesn't equal the most influence, necessarily. Yeah. But Marvel has had a huge cultural impact on today's society, right? And so even look at the first Avengers movie, the first Avengers movie was like, Whoa, this is the craziest thing like, a bunch of heroes like in one movie, like, whatever. You fast forward to now you really need to blow fan socks off with endgame and infinity war and new movies coming after endgame. Yeah, because that was the craziest movie one of the greatest movies of all time. Yeah. And so it's the same way when you think about like, when you think about like, Force Awakens, or rises Skywalker versus, versus episode six, episode four, A New Hope. It's like, you really need to blow fan socks out of the water if you want to impress them, because they've already seen it. That it once you've already seen it. It's like when you listen to an album for the first time, you've already listened to it. Yeah. And some of the magic. Unfortunately, this is just how it is some of the magic just goes away. And so that's why one of the biggest reasons I think that it can't like I don't think he can be the same, right? Because ever you get like, we we could find it in different ways. But there's never going to be the same magic of I'm going to the theater. I have no idea what this is. Yeah. What it what is the lightsaber? What is the Darth Vader? What is who's Obi Wan? Who's Luke Skywalker? What's an X Wing? And was it Death Star? Like you remember seeing that for the first time? Yeah. I like those movies already existed. When I started. I already played the games. When I started. I knew kind of what a lightsaber was, I knew. And that didn't take away the magic for me. Yep. But for people, people watching like these new movies and these new properties and whatever, you really got to do some special. And so yeah, yeah, I think that's, that's the last one. I think the internet makes it so difficult to, like, recreate that.

 

Tim Whitney 

Yeah, no, that's true. And it's funny, you talk about lightsabers, because like, as a kid, like it, if there had been one of those plastic lightsabers that you can get at Target, where you flick it with your wrist and it pops out back then, I mean, we would have been. So I don't know if you know this, but the toy lightsaber back in the day. So it had the handle, but it was a flashlight. And then the blade was inflatable. Okay, so you actually have to blow it up like, like a pool toy fit on there, somehow I can't remember. But of course, after like 20 minutes of whacking it into things, it would be all floppy and all over the place. And so, like even stuff like that has changed in my last. My last point is that, you know, they, George Lucas created this universe that was so compelling to people, especially back in the day that you wanted to spend time in it. Like you're doing things even when you weren't like doing official Star Wars things. And again, I mean, this is a product of the generation but you know, because because you couldn't watch it over and over and over again. You went out and you got books, you got the action figures. And I mean, I started with C three Bo and Tuscan Raider, actually, right there. We still have but it was like, all I could do was figure out adventures with these two with these two characters. You know, and then along the way, you got games, and then it started to be video games, but I used to build models. And so, you know, because Star Wars came out in 1977. Well, Empire strike back doesn't come out for three years. And so what are you going to do with those three years like you love this thing and So, you know, you create this universe in your head where you can live and Hamming sounds totally, totally stupid. But it's like, you had no choice. You had to, like, create it yourself. Yeah. And so I think that wires your brain differently when you're like building this whole thing yourself when other people are building it for you. And so obviously, over time, you know, the, there's been this demand for Star Wars that people have filled with games and toys, other movies and other properties and stuff. But you know, that just Star Wars created all of that. I mean, nobody knew what an action figure was until Star Wars came out. And so I mean, I think the other, the only other property that I can think of that comes close now is like Harry Potter. And, I mean, obviously, it was a book first, but that's one that really seems to have like Harry Potter, to me, feels like the Star Wars of this generation. Because, you know, it's, it's something that the children these days, consume. I mean, there's obviously this whole world where it's like, every single person, every character and replaced, you want to learn more about it. You want to learn how it works, and how they connect to each other and all of that. And that was the same way that Star Wars was where like, every single thing that you saw, was new. And you know, every creature like what's a Jawa? Yeah, this Zhao I get here, why? What is it doing? Why is it on this planet? And so there's, trust me, there's gonna be a whole other episodes about all of that. But it's like, you know, this whole idea that there's a universe that everyday people can go in and jailed and create? Yeah, no, no. All right. So then I want to talk about why might we be wrong?

 

Jack Whitney 

Yeah. So obviously, I've grown up in a different generation you have. And the thing I have written down for this is technology. Yeah. And I think we're in such a weird time, in a content creation, movie making song writing album, like structuring, like, any type of creative thing, painting, whatever it is, we're in such a weird time, because there's a huge group of people that want to chase the trends. What's popular, what are people gonna like? What's gonna give me the most clicks and the most money really fast? And so there's a lot of people who chase that, and there's a lot of people who also Chase Well, that's not really our anymore. Like we lost sight of what art is because of the internet, social media, whatever. But the reality is, the technology that exists now like the and I don't, I don't know anybody who wouldn't agree with this. And if you disagree with this, you can say but the new Star Wars movies look beautiful. Yeah, I mean, that scene, whatever CGI the worlds the lightsabers, I mean, the characters, the lighting, like everything like that, like cinematically. Yeah, they look incredible. And the big problems that people have come with the storytelling of the movies, right, you know, and so when you and you, I would say, you could say that about, you know, the prequels, if you're comparing them to the original trilogy to like, they look great, like, what are these vast landscapes for 2001? Yeah, I'm looking at like a huge world with moving cars, everywhere, castles and stuff like that. And so it's like, Okay, today, maybe in the storytelling, we have less originality, but in the ways we can tell the story, it's way different and way more vast than before. And so I think that opens up new avenues for people with the right mind and the right story to tell the greatest Star Wars story of all time, right? And it's only gonna get better as technology exists. So I think it's possible for people for somebody to top it like it is a totally is right. Like, I think somewhere along the way, eventually, maybe it's in five years, 10 years, 20 years, 30 years. Somebody is going to come along with the craziest idea and it's just going to hit I mean, you don't really know what it's just gonna hit with people. Yep. And and they're gonna have the best technology you've ever seen Star Wars have Yeah, use and that's kind of like the Mandalorian love in the book, a book that's coming out tomorrow night at the time of recording this, but like people are using that add more advanced technology, higher budget, different techniques to create a Star Wars story that people love. Right? Imagine that on five times 10 times 20 times scale, you know. So I think I think we could be wrong in the sense that like, maybe the cultural impact is a little different. But the story, like, I don't know, if we've seen the best Star Wars story. Yeah, you know, so,

 

Tim Whitney 

yeah, well, and so mine is very similar. And it has to do with like, how the technology just of content creation has changed. And so we're so we're sitting here in December of 2021. And so, if you had asked me this question, like, three months ago, I would have been like, No way, but a couple of things have happened just even over the last, like, month or so. So one is, you got Mr. Beast making this squid game thing on, on YouTube. And he brought in this VFX company so crispy, to make the VFX. And I mean, they, they did it, like they recreated a different property that was 100% believable, and they did it in like 10 days. Yeah. And so it's like a bunch of people who grabbed their PCs, brought it and did all the work. I mean, they're walking around with like, black magic, six K's filming this stuff. And so like, all of this stuff, is accessible to everyday people in ways that it wasn't before. And granted, I mean, it's still cost money. But you could trick yourself out with a decent camera and a decent PC for 10, grand, 20 grand, and make something and so the like, the other thing that happened is so Matt workman from cinematography database, he's doing like these mocap real time mocap stuff with Unreal Engine in his basement. And that's ridiculous. To think that you could like, You mean, you could do that you could basically act out every part in, you know, your, your idea, and have it be recreated in real time. And so and then you've got these tools like Unreal Engine and blender and everything else that are free. Yeah. And so anybody can use them. And so, like, I do you think there's like you said, there's gonna be a time where somebody comes up with a story that like really hooks people? No, yeah. And they, and they have the technical chops to do it. And, you know, gone are the days where like, you need $20 million, or $100 million dollars from a studio to be able to make something I mean, yes, yeah. Somebody to help you fund the whole thing. But, I mean, I think somebody is gonna come along and and make something cool. Oh, yeah, one of these days, and people aren't going to expect it. So I think there's definitely a place for that. Yeah. All right. So final verdict, will there be another Star Wars?

 

Jack Whitney 

Do you want to go? Do you want me to go?

 

Tim Whitney 

I will go first. i i for a lot of the reasons actually that you expressed. I don't think that there will be one. And here's why. Is it was like I talked about like, you know, if you wanted to watch Star Wars, you had to go to the movie theater. The next Star Wars came out three years later, right. And while we had some things that we could fill the gaps with, you know, Star Trek was still on TV, Battlestar Galactica, some other stuff. It's like, like you said, we couldn't, you know, we couldn't watch all of the movies in one day, and then the next day, move on to the next thing. And so it was like, it was scarce. And so that's one of the things that made it something that you obsessed about is like you want it to reconnect with that feeling that you had when you first saw it in the theater. And so you're like your brain expands to fill the universe with all of the cool things. And I think the way we consume media now is just different. Yeah. You could sit there I could sit there on my phone for like two hours and watch 200 different creators on Tik Tok or Instagram or whatever and like, all of a sudden you're flooded with Yazidi these ideas. And that just I mean, it didn't exist 45 years ago. It there's so many other choices for you to be able to like move on To the the next thing. And, and so it's too easy to fill your brain with other things that kind of give you that same feeling. And so that's why, again, it has nothing to do with the technology or the story itself. It has to do with just like how we consume. Yeah, media. So my personal opinion is that it would take it, it will take something really special, and whoever creates it is going to, like have to calibrate the consumption. So that, you know, people can't just, like, consume it all in one day. And so I get, like, with Harry Potter, you know, the books come out and takes a while in between each book. And so they you know, it's that same kind of thing. That That doesn't happen in video making or movie making these days. So I think somebody will create something that's different, like you talked about Marvel, I think Marvel did something that nobody thought was possible, which is, you know, they created something that existed over 20 movies, and it was all planned out. And it was utterly ridiculous. Like that, that I think is equally as impressive. Oh, yeah, kind of a cultural experience as what Star Wars was able to do to be its

 

Jack Whitney 

own episode. Yeah, right. That's a good.

 

Tim Whitney 

So but in terms of like, something that hits that nobody expects it. And all of a sudden everybody's obsessed with it. I'm not sure. I'm not convinced.

 

Jack Whitney 

Yeah, I I very, very similar opinion is I said, it will never be in caps. I said it will never be in lowercase. I said exactly the same. So it, it will never be. I agree with you. It will never be what we remember it to be. And I think that's one of the things that the sequels did was like, make everybody realize that nostalgia is powerful. So right, you know, and so, you know, it will never be exactly the same. Like, you'll never it's the same way with think about like, like the first time I play Call of Duty, right? Like call duty modern warfare. Yeah. Like the original one. War, that war like all those. It's never gonna be the exact same as that. I think. I think that it can be better. Maybe that's super optimistic. But I think somebody will come along eventually. And it won't be Disney won't be whatever. Like, it'll be its own thing. Yeah. And it's studio that has the utmost passion for Star Wars. That's just gonna knock it out of the park. And reinvigorate. 40 more years of content. Like I don't think Star Wars is ever going to be something that dies, or like Star Wars and never dead, you know. But will it will Star Wars as we knew it be the same? No, no, but will it transform into something better? Yeah. Yeah. You know, so.

 

Tim Whitney 

All right. Cool. All right. Well, we would love to hear what you guys have to think that wraps up the first episode of the heroes in whiskey podcast. You can find us on anchors, Spotify. Hopefully, it'll be on Apple and Google soon. I don't know I'm still figuring out where all those buttons are to click. And yeah, we will check you out for the next episode. Until then, do what's right love mercy walk humbly tell great stories and drink superior spirit. Yo, bye